Oops, I did it again

A couple years ago, I very happily reported here that I’d sold a “book of my heart,” which is a term authors use to describe a book they’ve written not to market trends but because they felt compelled to tell that particular story.

That book, Fall from Grace, was released by Bancroft Press in 2018. My favorite review of it came from Midwest Book Reviews, which called it “a novel for our times.”

As I reported at the time, it was a novel that didn’t fit easily into any of the categories traditional¬† publishing houses use to market books to booksellers (stores, in particular). It was a faith-drenched book about a broken marriage, but it dealt with mainline Protestantism and evangelicals, their world views, how people in both groups try to live Godly lives, even if they don’t always agree on what that means.

The book was dinged by some readers who posted reviews on Amazon, but it was clear these readers were expecting a traditional Christian fiction read, an “inspirational” novel where there’s no hint of impropriety, not even a mild curse word. (For my thoughts on that, here’s a post about Christian fiction.)

To that censorious reader, I offer a proactive apology: Sorry, but I did it again. I wrote another novel with faith issues that contains bad language at times. I haven’t sold this novel yet to a publisher. Maybe I never will. Maybe I’ll self-publish it at some point.

Titled The Reed Boat (for now, at least), here’s the story:

When her billionaire older husband discards everything to become a minister, young Emily Pendleton supports his decision–until she discovers he intends to discard her and her baby, too. As she raises her daughter alone, she seeks another tossed-aside item, a cheap cross necklace her late mother had given her that holds a key to a heartbreaking past. A novel about the sacrifices women make for their children, The Reed Boat is ultimately a story about mothers protecting children from unscrupulous men.

The reason this book will probably be a hard sell in the publishing world is because it contains a subtle pro-life message. Trust me, it doesn’t hammer the issue or hit you over the head with it. If you’re among the majority of Americans who want abortion to remain legal but only under certain circumstances (53 percent, according to Gallup in 2019), then this story will not offend.

gettyimages-200569519-001-2048x2048I suspect, however, that the publishing world isn’t filled with those kinds of Americans. I suspect the publishing world is populated by people who hold the view that abortion should be legal under any circumstance, with no restrictions at all (25 percent, according to the Gallup poll mentioned above). So even if a book is primarily about keeping innocents safe from men who might harm them, it will have a hard time finding a home in the publishing world if there’s even a hint of sympathy for the pro-life stance.

I’d love to be proven wrong on that. If there’s an editor out there reading this who doesn’t hold that view, I’ll happily send you a copy of the manuscript.

What about Christian fiction publishing? Maybe it might fit there, but not in Christian romance, because The Reed Boat has no clear romance HEA. And I do include some language that those publishers might believe is problematic.

Again, I’d enjoy being proven wrong on this supposition, as well, and I’d gladly email the book to Christian fiction editors willing to give it a read.

I’m happy to report, in fact, that there is, as of this writing, one editor looking at the manuscript, and I’m querying some agents, too, about it, most of whom I’ve not yet heard from. It’s early days yet, though, on that process.

I don’t know if The Reed Boat will eventually … sail. But I do know sometimes authors feel compelled to tell a story, whether it’s their muse or the Spirit moving them. The Reed Boat is that kind of story for me.

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under Uncategorized, women's issues, writing

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